Seabrook Plantation

Fast Facts

 

Owners:

 

  • The farmlands along Skull Creek were divided into as many as ten or twelve plantations during the eighteenth century owned by the Conyers, Ladson, Talbird, Fyler, Currell, Wallis, Greene, Waight, Eden, Elliott, Stoney and other families.
  • Thomas Henry Barksdale gathered all the lands from Elliott’s Myrtle Bank to Stoney’s Fairfield into one 2600-acre tract, which he called Skull Creek Plantation.
  • At his death the western 1000 acres was sold to Squire Pope who called it Cotton Hope.
  • William Seabrook, Esq., planter of Edisto Island, bought the eastern 1600 acres, consisting of four plantations formerly owned by the Fylers, Currels, Talbirds and the Wallises, c. 1820.
  • After the confiscation William’s heir, James Seabrook, was unable to redeem it.  Redeemed for taxes due by R. C. McIntire, who promised to hold it until James Seabrook could pay for it.
  • In 1873 Seabrook deeded it to Robert C. McIntire.
  • Will Clyde purchased in 1895.
  • Ray Rainey
  • Thorne and Loomis, 1931

See also Skull Creek Plantation

 

Land - Cotton a major crop raised by William Seabrook.

 

Maps - Hack, "Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, before 1861"

 

Bibliography -

 

 Holmgren, Research on Hilton Head Island
 Holmgren, Hilton Head, A Sea Island Chronicle
 Peeples, An Index to Hilton Head Island Names

 

Additional Information:

 

38BU323/1149, 38BU823/830/832/337/35

 

Also see Skull Creek Plantation

 

8BU323 and 38BU1149 are one site.  1149 was erroneously applied to the site by the Low Country Council of Governments. Seabrook represents antebellum occupation, intensive military and freedman occupation during the Civil War.   Recommended for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places at a national level.

 

38BU830 is the site of a possible freedman's house.  Also evidences several discrete shell middens of Middle to Late Woodland St. Catherine's sites and is recommended for National Register of Historic Places.

 

Chicora Research Series 13, Archaeological Testing of Six Sites on Hilton Head Island, Beaufort County, South Carolina, p. 54, 70, 86
(Source material noted in survey)

 

William Seabrook of Edisto Island purchased this 1600 acre tract of Skull Creek Plantation from Mrs. Thomas Henry Barksdale (Martha Stoney) in 1832. Seabrook, one of the largest and most successful of the Sea Island Cotton planters, owned the plantation until the Civil War.   Federal forces on Hilton Head Island used the area as a supply base and dry dock for ship repairs.

 

South Carolina Institute of A & A original listing

 

“And to piece together another 1600 acres in that area certainly means that Skull Creek Plantation then included a conglomerate of lands formerly owned by Ladson, Talbird, Fyler, Currel, Conyers and Wallis families.  This was the 1600 acre tract long known as Seabrook Plantation since it was bought in 1832 by...William Seabrook, the elegant planter from Edisto Island...His heir in 1860, Joseph Seabrook, was unable to raise the money necessary to redeem it under the Redemption Act of 1875 and it was lost to the family."

 

Peeples, Tales of Ante Bellum Hilton Head Island Families, p. 9-10

 

William Seabrook bought the four plantations lying between Cotton Hope and Myrtle Bank formerly owned by the Flyers, Currels, Talbirds or Talbots and the Wallises or Wallaces. His heir, James Seabrook, was unable to redeem it under the Act of 1872 for lack of funds. R.C. McIntire bought it, promising James that he could buy it back whenever he had the money. In 1873 James deeded Seabrook to McIntire, apparently still unable to raise the small sum needed. After McIntire's death the land went to Clyde in 1895.

 

Holmgren, Virginia C., Hilton Head, A Sea Island Chronicle, p. 131-132

 

"Some days later (after November 7, 1862) the Seabrook home had already been plundered by the Negroes and soldiers so little remained."

 

Holmgren, p. 95

 

"The background of Seabrook is confusing.  Holmgren  claims William Seabrook, Sr. consolidated Fyler, Currel, Talbird and Wallis lands early in the 1800's.   Peeples claims Seabrook purchased 1600 acres from Barksdale's Skull Creek Plantation in 1832. The remaining acres became Pope's Cotton Hope Plantation.   A deed dated May 23, 1833 documented the sale of 590 acres to William Seabrook by Joseph Wallace for $8,000.   This land was between Cotton Hope and Myrtle Bank Plantations. The fact that Seabrook's estate, in 1836, does not list Seabrook Plantation indicates it was investment property. He did leave the use of the land to his wife Elizabeth for her lifetime.  

 

Records indicate that William's second cousin James B. Seabrook, son of Joseph Baynard Seabrook, had acquired the property by 1850.   In 1861 the area was occupied by Federal troops and the house was a Federal headquarters guarding Skull Creek. Confederate forces had evacuated the island from Seabrook Landing.

 

By 1863 the plantation was the location of machine shops and a shipyard for the support of the Federal blockade but by 1865 a directive was issued to sell the contents of the machine shops at public auction. A machine shop is still listed on the property in 1867.

 

After the Civil War attorney Robert C. McIntire purchased the tract in 1872 for James. In 1873 James Seabrook deeded the property to McIntire since he could not meet the payments. The property remained largely intact.

 

Chicora Research Series 13, p. 33

 

38BU337 structural remains severely damaged by erosion. 
38BU823 is probably two structures south of the plantation buildings by the marsh.
38BU35 donates the Seabrook Cemetery

 

Chicora Research Series 13, p. 

 

The rich farm lands along Skull Creek were divided into as many as ten or twelve plantations during the eighteenth century with Conyers, Ladson, Talbird, Fyler, Currell, Wallis, Greene, Waight, Eden, Elliott, Stoney and other families enjoying their bounty.  Then Thomas Henry Barksdale (1795-1832) gathered into one vast 2600 acre tract, which he called Skull Creek Plantation, all the lands from Elliott’s Myrtle Bank to Stoney’s Fairfield.  At his death the western 1000 acres were bought by William Seabrook, Esq., the elegant planter of Edisto Island, who had in 1825 so lavishly entertained the Marquis de Lafayette.  After the confiscation William’s heir, James Seabrook, was unable to redeem it and in 1873 deeded it to Robert C. McIntire whose heirs sold it to Will Clyde in 1895.

 

Peeples, An Index to Hilton Head Island Names (Before the Contemporary Development), p. 36

 

 



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